This website was developed under Assistance Agreement No. RD83587301 awarded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. It has not been formally reviewed by EPA. The views expressed on this website are solely those of The CACES Center and do not necessarily reflect those of the Agency. EPA does not endorse any products or commercial services mentioned within this website.

These models provide estimates of outdoor concentrations for six pollutants (four gases: O3, CO, SO2, NO2. Two aerosols: PM10, PM2.5) throughout the contiguous U.S. Model estimates are annual-average values for years 1979 – 2015 (O3, SO2, NO2), 1988 – 2015 (PM10), 1990-2015 (CO), and 1999-2015 (PM2.5). Data are available at national, state, county, census tract, and census block group levels.

 

Please see the README file for more information.

CACES participants have developed three models that estimate human health impacts from emissions of PM2.5, SO2, NOx, NH3, and VOCs:   AP2,   EASIUR, and   InMAP. This page contains results from the three models in terms of economic damages caused by human exposure to air pollution as a function of the location of emissions.

Please see the RCM User Guide for more information. Also, an inter-comparison of the models is available here.

Data is free and publicly available, please cite as follows:

 

"This article includes [concentration/damages] estimates developed by the Center for Air, Climate and Energy Solutions using [v1 empirical models/AP2/EASIUR/InMAP] as described in [insert suggested citation]."

 

Suggested citation:

v1 empirical models: Kim S.-Y.; Bechle, M.; Hankey, S.; Sheppard, L.; Szpiro, A. A.; Marshall, J. D. 2018. “Concentrations of criteria pollutants in the contiguous U.S., 1979 – 2015: Role of prediction model parsimony in integrated empirical geographic regression.” In Review.

 

AP2: Muller, N. Z. 2014. “Boosting GDP growth by accounting for the environment.” Science 345 (6199), 873-74. DOI: 10.1126/science.1253506

 

EASIUR: Heo, J.; Adams, P. J.; Gao, H. 2016. “Reduced-form modeling of public health impacts of inorganic PM2.5 and precursor emissions.” Atmospheric Environment 137, 80–89. DOI:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2016.04.026

 

InMAP: Tessum, C. W.; Hill, J. D.; Marshall, J. D. 2017. “InMAP: A model for air pollution interventions.” PLoS ONE 12 (4), e0176131. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0176131.

Data 
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There are two types of CACES model  results currently available: